Arkansas Plane Crash Kills 1

small planeDuring a training flight on Thursday, May 5th, a Cessna 310F twin-engine plane crashed at the North Little Rock Municipal Airport, killing one of its two occupants and severely injuring the other. The crash happened during a “check ride” required to be administered as part of the requirements for an air transport license.

According to the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB), the plane’s left engine experienced a loss of engine power shortly after takeoff. Following the loss of engine power, the plane crashed and burst into flames upon impact. The flames crept dangerously close to a fuel tank by the Central Arkansas Water facility.

A preliminary report released by the NTSB said that radar indicated the plane reached a top speed of 96 knots as it took off from the runway. The plane reportedly slowed to 79 knots just before it crashed. The lowest speed at which the Cessna 310F could be controlled was 70 knots.

The Cessna 310F is a low-wing, six-seat aircraft powered by two piston propeller-driven engines. The aircraft was Cessna's first twin-engine model and was last produced in 1980. According to the aircraft's tail number, the plane is registered to and operated by Lashbrook Inc. of Sherwood, Arkansas.

Who is Liable?

Aviation litigation can be complex and often involves many potential defendants and theories of liability under state, federal, and sometimes international law. In order to hold someone legally responsible for an aviation accident, the injured person must prove that the person or entity responsible failed to meet an industry standard related to operation of the aircraft, engineering, or certain regulatory issues.

While the circumstances of each aviation accident are always different, claims for personal injury or death resulting from an aviation accident are generally controlled by the legal theories of negligence and product liability.

Contact Fleming | Nolen | Jez, L.L.P

The experienced personal injury attorneys at Fleming | Nolen | Jez, L.L.P. understand that airplane accidents are sometimes the result of negligence. If you or someone you know has been involved in an aviation accident, contact our firm today for an evaluation of your case at no charge.

Sources

  1. http://www.ntsb.gov/_layouts/ntsb.aviation/brief.aspx?ev_id=20160505X61259&key=1
  2. http://www.arkansasonline.com/news/2016/may/17/deadly-nlr-plane-crash-blamed-on-loss-o/?f=latest
  3. http://katv.com/news/local/report-plane-that-crashed-in-north-little-rock-lost-power
  4. http://www.arkansasmatters.com/news/local-news/plane-crashes-at-north-little-rock-airport
  5. http://injury.findlaw.com/torts-and-personal-injuries/aviation-accidents-overview.html

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Categories: Aviation Accidents